ANNUAL REPORT 2011 for the year ended March 31, 2011

Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements

Credit Saison Co., Ltd. and Consolidated Subsidiaries
For the Years Ended March 31, 2011 and 2010

11. Financial Instruments And Related Disclosures

In March 2008, the ASBJ revised ASBJ Statement No. 10 "Accounting Standard for Financial Instruments" and issued ASBJ Guidance No. 19 "Guidance on Accounting Standard for Financial Instruments and Related Disclosures." This accounting standard and the guidance are applicable to financial instruments and related disclosures at the end of the fiscal years ending on or after March 31, 2010. The Companies applied the revised accounting standard and the new guidance effective March 31, 2010.

The Conditions of Financial Instruments
(A) Policy For Financial Instruments

The Companies engage in the credit service business; lease business; finance business including guarantees and loans businesses; real estate related business; and entertainment business. To conduct such businesses, the Companies, by observing the market circumstances and adjusts the balance of long-term and short-term debts, seek finance through indirect financing such as bank loans and through direct financing such as issuance of corporate bonds and commercial paper and securitized receivables. Through such activities, the Companies hold financial assets and financial liabilities that are mostly accompanied by interest rate risk, and the Company conducts asset and liability management (ALM) to prevent disadvantageous effects from such interest rate risk. As part of its ALM, the Company also conducts derivative transactions that leverage interest rate swaps, etc.

(B) Nature And Extent of Risks Arising From Financial Instruments

The financial assets held by the Companies are mainly accounts receivable-installments from credit card members, and the Companies are exposed to credit risk such as the potential deterioration of the member's repayment situation. As of the end of the current fiscal year, the accounts receivable-installment included a large component of receivables related to credit service business and credit card repayments by members according to the contract depend on changes of business circumstances including the economic environment surrounding said business (employment environment in the fallout of the economic recession, household disposable income and personal consumption).

Also, (operational) investment securities are mainly stocks, bonds, investment trusts and partnership investments. Such securities are held for the purpose of either trading or business promotion. Each of these securities is exposed to the issuer's credit risks, interest rate fluctuation risks and market price fluctuation risks.

The Companies are exposed to liquidity risks relating to interest-bearing debts such as loans, corporate bonds and commercial paper whereby it may be unable to execute payments of such liabilities on the payment dates in cases, for example, where the Companies are unable to use the market under certain circumstances such as a greater-than-expected fluctuation in financial condition or a downgrading of the Companies' credit rating. Furthermore, the Companies also borrow funds by variable interest loans, and although they are exposed to interest fluctuation risks, those risks are partly mitigated by conducting interest swap transactions.

Among the derivative transactions conducted by the Companies are interest swap transactions conducted as part of ALM. Using these interest swap transactions as the hedge instruments, the Company applies hedge accounting to interest fluctuation risk related to borrowings that are the hedged item. The hedge is assessed based on the cumulative total of cash flow fluctuation and determined to actually have been highly effective throughout the financial reporting periods for which the hedge is designated.

In addition, the interest rate swaps which qualify for hedge accounting of long-term loans and meet specific matching criteria are not remeasured at market value but the differential paid or received under the swap agreements is recognized and included in interest expense or income.

(C) Risk Management For Financial Instruments

i. Credit risk management

The Companies manage their credit risk in accordance with the Companies credit risk management rules by ensuring the ongoing soundness of receivables and maintaining a system for credit risk management including credit limit, management of creditworthiness information, and internal ratings. The Company holds regular Board of Directors meetings in order to discuss and report matters relating to this credit risk management. (Operational) investment securities are managed by periodically ascertaining creditworthiness information and fair values at ALM committee meetings.

Also, with regard to long-term loans receivable, the relevant departments periodically monitor the credit risk of the obligors. With regard to counterparty risk of derivative transactions, in order to avoid credit risk arising from defaults on contractual obligations, the Company chooses Japanese and overseas banks and securities firms with high creditworthiness as the counterparty to contracts.

ii. Market risk management

Management of fluctuation risk of interest rates

The Companies manage interest rate fluctuation risks by applying ALM. The rules related to ALM state the details of risk management methods, procedures and so forth. Based on policies determined at the ALM committee meetings, the Board of Directors ascertains the status of implementation and discusses matters concerning future response at the meetings. As part of its regular routine, the Treasury & Account Department maintains an overall grasp of the interest rates and terms of financial assets and liabilities and conducts monitoring such as by interest rate gap analysis. When conducting interest rate swap derivative transactions for the purpose of hedging interest rate variable risk, the Companies apply ALM to this also.

Management of fair value fluctuation risk

With regard to financial investment products including (operational) investment securities, pursuant to ALM policy, in addition to examining each investment project before investment and establishing limit amounts for investment, continuous monitoring is also conducted for the purpose of mitigating the price fluctuation risk. Moreover, with regard to stock held for the purpose of business promotion, including business and capital tie-ups, the market environment and the financial condition of the transaction counterparty are also monitored through relevant departments.

This information is periodically reported through the relevant departments to the ALM committee meetings and other meetings.

Derivatives

The Treasury & Account Department executes derivative transactions in accordance with internal management regulations set by the Board of Directors, keeping within the scope of the overall transaction framework and hedge ratio approved beforehand by the Board of Directors. The status of the derivative transactions is reported to the Board of Directors on a quarterly basis.

The derivative transactions of consolidated subsidiaries are conducted in accordance with the internal management regulations that have been set by the respective company. During the term of the transactions, the subsidiary reports to the Company on a quarterly basis the status of hedges between the derivative transactions and corresponding assets or liabilities, the counterparty to contracts, the transaction amounts, the period remaining in the terms, and the transaction fair values.

Quantitative information regarding market risk

The main financial instruments of the Companies exposed to interest rate risk as the main risk are accounts receivable-installment, short-term loans, long-term debts, corporate bonds, securitized receivables, and interest rate swap transactions.

The Companies estimate the impact of a reasonable fluctuation in interest rate on profit and loss a year or so from the end of an accounting period for the purpose of quantitative analysis in managing its variable risk on interest rates. In estimating this impact, the financial assets and financial liabilities subject to the analysis are grouped into subsets of fixed-interest assets and liabilities and variable-interest assets and liabilities. The Companies then calculate the net estimated impact of interest rate fluctuation on variable- interest assets and variable-interest liabilities as the interest rate gap.

As of March 31, 2011, the Companies calculated that their income before income taxes and minority interests would decrease ¥44 million ($532 thousand) if the benchmark interest rate rose 1 basis point (0.01 percentage point), and increase ¥44 million ($532 thousand) if this interest rate fell 1 basis point. The impact was calculated holding risk variables other than the interest rate constant, and in the absence of correlations between the other risk variables and interest rate. Fluctuations in interest rates greater than those reasonably estimated may result in an impact larger than the aforementioned calculations.

iii. Liquidity risk management

The Companies manage their liquidity risk by applying ALM. In addition to ensuring fund management is conducted with appropriate timeliness, it ensures a multiplicity of fund procurement methods, secures commitment lines from multiple financial institutions and maintains a balance of long-term and short-term procurement that is adjusted to reflect the current market environment.

(D) Supplementary Explanation Relating To Fair Value of Financial Instruments And Others

The fair value of financial instruments is either an amount based on market prices or, in the case of no market value, the value calculated based on rational grounds. In the case of the latter, established assumptions and conditions are adopted. Accordingly, if different assumptions and preconditions are adopted, the calculated amount may also be different. Moreover, with regard to contractual value or the national principal amount that relate to derivative transactions in Note 17 the amount itself does not reflect market risk related to the derivative transaction.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments And Others

The following presents the amount presented in the consolidated balance sheet for the years ended March 31, 2011 and 2010, the fair value, and the difference between the carrying amount and fair value. Immaterial amounts in the consolidated balance sheet have been omitted from disclosure.


Assets

  Millions of yen
2011
Carrying
amount
Allowance for
doubtful
accounts
Total Fair value Difference
Cash and deposits¥ 64,112¥ -¥ 64,112¥ 64,112¥ -
Accounts receivable-installment1,491,108(103,807)1,387,3011,452,05864,757
Lease investment assets219,895(13,527) 206,368219,89413,526
Short-term loans receivable10,144(483)9,6619,661-
Operational investment securities865-865865-
Securities982-982982-
Investment securities30,104-30,10430,104-
Investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries and
  affiliated companies
5,722-5,7229,3333,611
Long-term loans receivable15,166(4,426)10,74010,740-

  Millions of yen
2010
Carrying
amount
Allowance for
doubtful
accounts
Total Fair value Difference
Cash and deposits ¥ 64,232 ¥ - ¥ 64,232 ¥ 64,232 ¥ -
Accounts receivable-installment 1,688,748 (108,173) 1,580,575 1,655,668 75,093
Lease investment assets214,232(12,565)201,667217,70316,036
Short-term loans receivable14,301(324)13,97713,977-
Securities298-298298-
Investment securities33,376-33,37633,376-
Investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries and
  affiliated companies
5,572-5,5724,856(716)
Long-term loans receivable15,334(4,333)11,00111,001-

Thousands of U.S. dollars
2011
Carrying
amount
Allowance for
doubtful
accounts
Total Fair value Difference
Cash and deposits$ 771,035$ -$ 771,035$ 771,035$ -
Accounts receivable-installment17,932,751(1,248,439)16,684,31217,463,112778,800
Lease investment assets2,644,558(162,685)2,481,8732,644,540162,667
Short-term loans receivable122,001(5,810)116,191116,191-
Operational investment securities10,400-10,40010,400-
Securities11,812-11,81211,812-
Investment securities362,039-362,039362,039-
Investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries and
  affiliated companies
68,818-68,818112,24643,428
Long-term loans receivable182,394(53,232)129,162129,162-

(A) Cash And Deposits

For deposits with no maturity, as fair value approximates the carrying value, the carrying value is deemed to be the fair value.

(B) Accounts Receivable-Installment

Accounts receivable-installment items with variable interest rates have interest rates that reflect the market interest rate in the short term, and because the fair value approximates the carrying value providing that the creditworthiness of the obligor does not significantly change after a loan is executed, the carrying value is deemed to be the fair value. The fair value of accounts receivables-installment with fixed interest rate is determined by discounting the cash flow related to the financial assets reflecting credit risk at the risk-free rate. With respect to doubtful claims, because the amount obtained by deducting the current estimated irrecoverable balance from the amount stated on the balance sheet as of the end of the current year is assumed to approximate the fair value, this amount is deemed to be the fair value.

Because the fair value of a part of accounts receivables-installment is assumed to approximate the carrying value from reasons such as the estimated repayment period and the interest rate conditions, the carrying value is deemed to be the fair value.

Note that the fair value calculations stated above do not reflect future interest repayments.

(C) Lease Investment Assets

The fair value of lease investment assets is determined by discounting the cash flows reflecting credit risk at the risk-free rate.

(D) Opeartional Investment Securities, Securities Investment Securities And Investments In Unconsolidated Subsidiaries And Affiliated Companies

The fair value of listed stock depends on the listed price on the stock exchange, and the fair value of debentures depends on the price disclosed by the listed price on the stock exchange or the price made available by the transacting financial institutions. The fair value of investment trusts is based on a reference price that has been publicly released. Concerning the investments in investment limited partnerships or similar associations, the fair value of the association's assets shall be the fair value appraisal in cases where fair value appraisal of the association's assets is possible and the corresponding equity share of the aforesaid fair value shall be deemed to be the fair value of the investment in the association.

Financial instruments with no market price such as unlisted stocks whose fair values cannot be reliably determined are indicated in the table below and are not included in fair value disclosure.


  Millions of yen   Thousands of
U.S. dollars
2011 2010   2011
Carrying
amount
Carrying
amount
  Carrying
amount
Unlisted stocks¥10,485¥ 9,984 $126,096
Investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries and affiliated companies23,66821,246 284,636
Unlisted debentures2,800- 33,674
Other8,206849 98,699

For notes concerning available-for-sale securities for each holding purpose, refer to "12. Available-For-Sale Securities."

(E) Short-Term Loans Receivable

Because short-term loans receivable will be settled within the short term, the fair value approximates the carrying value and the carrying value is deemed to be the fair value.

(F) Long-Term Loans Receivable

Long-term loans receivable items with variable interest rates have interest rates that reflect the market interest rate in the short-term, and because the fair value approximates the carrying value providing that the creditworthiness of the obligor does not significantly change after a loan is executed, the carrying value is deemed to be the fair value. With respect to doubtful claims, because the amount obtained by deducting the current estimated irrecoverable balance from the amount stated on the balance sheet as of the end of the current year is assumed to approximate the fair value, this amount is deemed to be the fair value.


Liabilities

  Millions of yen   Thousands of U.S. dollars
2011 2010   2011
Carrying
amount
Fair value Difference Carrying
amount
Fair value Difference   Carrying
amount
Fair value Difference
Notes and accounts payable ¥171,066 ¥171,066 ¥ - ¥206,656 ¥206,656 ¥ -   $2,057,314 $2,057,314 $ -
Short-term loans 248,029 248,029 - 296,923 296,923 -   2,982,910 2,982,910 -
Commercial paper 110,000 110,000 - 133,000 133,000 -   1,322,910 1,322,910 -
Long-term debt:                   -
Long-term loans payable 830,595 837,532 (6,937) 833,632 831,475 2,157   9,989,117 10,072,549 (83,432)
Bonds 256,112 259,713 (3,601) 236,338 231,249 5,089   3,080,126 3,123,422 (43,296)
Long-term loans
  payable on undersecuritized
    loans
94,169 94,800 (631) 149,131 149,874 (743)   1,132,518 1,140,107 (7,589)
Lease obligations 5,528 5,528 - 3,804 3,804 -   66,477 66,477 -
Guarantee contracts - 6,508 6,508 - 8,259 8,259   - 78,264 78,264

(A) Notes And Accounts Payable, Short-Term Loans, And Commercial Paper

Because these items will be settled within the short term, the fair value approximates the carrying value and the carrying value is deemed to be the fair value.

(B) Long-Term Loans Payable

Because the rate of long-term loans payable at the variable interest rate reflects the market interest rate, long-term loans payable at the variable interest rate is valued considering only the fluctuation of credit spreads. The fair value of long-term loans payable with fixed interest rate is determined by discounting the cash flow related to debt at the rate assumed for the same borrowing.

(C) Bonds

For corporate bonds issued by the Company as public-offering bonds, the fair value is decided by the market price (over-the-counter selling and buying reference statistics for public and corporate bonds decided by the Japan Securities Dealers Association). Private placement bonds issued by the Company are underwritten by the Company's major banks based on negotiated transactions, and the fair value of such items is calculated using the same method as for (B) long-term loans payable.

(D) Long-Term Loans Payable On Under-Securitized Loans

Because the rate of long-term loans payable on under-securitized loans with a variable interest rate is not affected by changes in the Companies' credit worthiness, the items are valued at changes in the market interest rate. The fair value of long-term loans payable on under-securitized loans with a fixed interest rate is determined by discounting the cash flow related to debt at the rate assumed for the same borrowing.

(E) Lease Obligations

As the fair value of lease obligations approximate the carrying values, the carrying value is deemed to be the fair value.

(F) Guarantee Contracts

The fair value of guarantee contracts is determined by discounting the cash flow related to a contract reflecting credit risk at the risk-free rate.

As of March 31, 2011 the guarantee contract amount of contingent liabilities is ¥157,791 million (US$1,897,668 thousand) and the amount that was recorded as allowance for losses on guarantees in the consolidated balance sheet was ¥5,464 million (US$65,713 thousand).

Note: Maturity analysis for financial assets and securities with contractual maturities subsequent to March 31, 2011 is as follows:


Year ending March 31 Millions of yen
2011
Due in one
year or less
Due after one
year through
two years
Due after two
years through
three years
Due after
three years
through four
years
Due after four
years through
five years
Due after five
years
Cash and deposits ¥ 64,112 ¥ - ¥ - ¥ - ¥ - ¥ -
Accounts receivable-installment 965,453 231,983 55,767 14,598 8,069 29,142
Lease investment assets 54,685 51,433 44,788 34,335 20,962 10,169
Short-term loans receivable 10,144 - - - - -
Investment securities
Available-for-sale securities with
contractual maturities
5,982 500 - 1,700 600 969
Long-term loans receivable 18 18 18 18 18 147

Year ending March 31 Thousands of U.S. dollars
2011
Due in one
year or less
Due after one
year through
two years
Due after two
years through
three years
Due after
three years
through four
years
Due after four
years through
five years
Due after five
years
Cash and deposits $ 771,035 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ -
Accounts receivable-installment 11,610,985 2,789,928 670,685 175,557 97,041 350,480
Lease investment assets 657,667 618,551 538,637 412,934 252,094 122,302
Short-term loans receivable 122,001 - - - - -
Investment securities
Available-for-sale securities with
contractual maturities
71,944 6,013 - 20,445 7,216 11,652
Long-term loans receivable 216 216 216 216 216 1,767

The amount of ¥204,549 million (US$2,459,996 thousand) estimated uncollectible is not included. Please see Note. 9 for annual maturities of long term debt.

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